According to the IDEA

Please answer the following question. Please do not mix the questions. They are separate.

1. In considering the IEP development of a student with ASD, what members of the team should have input in the creation of the IEP? Why?

Respond to student discussion:

(EL)All members of the team should have input in the creation and development of the IEP, including parents and when appropriate, the student. According to the IDEA, IEP team for a child with a disability includes parents, general education teacher, special education teacher, representative of the public agency, individuals who can interpret the instructional implications of evaluation results, other individuals who have knowledge or special expertise regarding the child, related services personnel, and the child (IDEA, n.d.) Each of these members have a significant role in contributing to the development of the IEP. For example, in addition to parents, gen. ed./sp. ed. teachers, and administrators, IEP team for a student with ASD in my class also includes a BCBA, PT, OT, SLP, and APE specialist. These service providers give a better overall assessment of the student’s progress and present levels of performance. Different members contribute to different areas of the IEP process and each should have input in recommending placement, goals, services, and more.

2. How can special educators ensure that parents have input in IEP development? What can educators do if parents refuse to attend an IEP meeting? What are the ethical considerations involved in IEP development and parental involvement?

Response to student discussion:

(Audrey) How can special educators ensure that parents have input in IEP development?

I do not think that special educators can ensure that parents have input in the IEP development; however, they can ensure that they have the option to give their input. This can be achieved through effective communication. If the parents have internet, teachers could send a survey form through google; the same thing could be done through a questionnaire sent home, as well. I also communicate with my parents about issues and successes – I think that they should know what’s going on in their educational endeavors; the communication shouldn’t be cut off in elementary school – high school parents care, too (sometimes).

What can educators do if parents refuse to attend an IEP meeting?

In my district, if there has been (at least) three contact attempts, then the parent’s signature is not required for the locking of the IEP. The caveat, however, is that the contact attempts must be different and one of them has to be in the form of a letter sent home.

What are the ethical considerations involved in IEP development and parental involvement?

  • 2-D. NASET Members strive to ensure access to needed information, services, and resources for children with special needs (National Association of Special Education Teachers, 2007). This standard expresses the need for special education teachers to gather the information needed to determine services and resources for their students. Often, parents are the people who know the student the best.
  • 5-A. NASETMembers cooperate with community agencies in using resources and building comprehensive services in support of children with specials needs (National Association of Special Education Teachers, 2007). Continued communication should result in effective collaboration for ongoing support.
  • 5-B. NASETMembers partner with parents of children with special needs and other members of the community to enhance programs for children with special needs (National Association of Special Education Teachers, 2007). Special education teachers should create relationships with parents and members of the community – relationships yield a sense of belonging (Maslow knew what he was talking about)!
  • 5-C. NASETMembers understand how cultural diversity, family dynamics, gender, and community shape the lives of the individuals with whom they collaborate (National Association of Special Education Teachers, 2007). The whole child should be considered when addressing the needs of a student with disabilities – this includes all elements of the student’s culture.
  • 5-D. NASETMembers understand that relationships between and among people are an important vehicle for change (National Association of Special Education Teachers, 2007). When relationships flourish, then there is a vector for communication. This open communication will allow the open expression of changing needs.
  • 5-E. NASETMembers respect the private nature of the special knowledge they have about children and their families and use that knowledge only in the students’ best interests (National Association of Special Education Teachers, 2007). This standard goes deeper than just adhering to FERPA. It asks special education teachers to not let the student’s family dynamic and unique background influence their decisions and outlook on the student with disabilities.

National Association of Special Education Teachers. (2007, June 11). National Association of Special Education Teachers: Code of Ethics. Retrieved from https://www.naset.org/index.php?id=2444

Read “Individualized Education Plan (IEP)” on the Autism Society.

http://www.autism-society.org/individualized-education-plan-iep/

Explor the Autism Society website.

http://www.autism-society.org/