MIT Press

Part 1: How can information you learned in this course be applied to your life and/or work to increase your future success?

Part 2: What personal continuous improvement efforts are currently within your sphere of influence? What will you do about it? If you are not currently in a school, describe an interest area for personal continuous improvement that you believe would hold potential to improve student achievement, and tell why you would choose this area.

REPLY TO MY CLASSMATE’S POST TELLING WHY YOU AGREE. Write your reflections on why you agree with the classmate post by selecting an idea from the classmate’s post, describing your thoughts and feelings about it.

This course was a deep dive into the reality of data. All those little facts are powerful forces when gathered, analyzed, and accurately presented. Presenting clearly organized data carries a convincing and motivating element not carried by conversation. Data speaks for itself. Developing strategies flourish with accurate data. This course has reinforced my belief in operating from an abundance of data. You can’t argue with facts. And data is not to be feared.

Continuous iteration (I like that word and use it over and over again) is essential to continuous improvement. The plan, do, study, and act cycle is one of the foundations we use as safety professionals. Our world is constantly changing politically, environmentally, socially, and technologically. It is foolish to think that one change to a system is good enough for years. There is no one size fits all solution. I remember Nancy Leveson’s MIT comment about safety, “Depending on humans not to male mistakes is an almost certain way to guarantee that accidents will happen” (p. 226). Continuous improvement efforts are constant with all our clients. They often call it LEAN principles, I just call it, “do it again.” I like in my sphere of influence that I have the latitude to control my own professional development. Perhaps this is why I am proud to be a Waldorf Warrior.

I’m gonna miss you guys.

Reference

Leveson, N., (2012). Engineering a safer world; Systems thinking applied to safety. MIT Press.