Research Methodology

QUESTION #4

Research Methodology

Develop a research question emerging from your interest and readings in OB (either at the individual, team, or organizational level).  Be sure the topic is an OB academic concept from your course readings.  Examples include individual concepts of OB such as job satisfaction or organizational commitment; team concepts such as team effectiveness or team innovation; or organization concepts such as organizational development or leading change.  The topic is your choice but it must be founded in OB theory/literature.  You will need to determine a direction (e.g., subtopics or narrowing the topic) for your response. Complete a sufficient (8-12 article) literature review that helps you refine a research question and build a brief theoretical frame for your research. Based upon the theoretical frame, propose a succinct research method and design that you could use to plausibly answer your research question.

Your design does not have to be dissertation proposal ready. However, it should be a clear plan that concisely addresses the important pieces of a research design. Be sure to support your design decisions with academically credible methodological sources.  As a guide, you may use one of the following outlines (whichever is appropriate) for your response. Be sure to support the decisions that you make in your proposal.

Quantitative Study

Introduction—one or two paragraphs that introduces the reader to your topic (narrowed topic), why it is important, the problem or gap you have discovered (problem statement), and the purpose of your study.
Literature Review—a brief (8-12 scholarly sources) review of the literature that provides a strong rationale for your study and builds a cohesive theoretical frame.
Research method and design – brief paragraph indicating the type of research study you are going to do, justifying your choice.
Population and sample –describe the population for your study, your sampling technique (and size) and why it is appropriate. Address any delimitations/limitations and how you will protect human rights and gain consent.
Hypotheses – clarify your research hypotheses and their connection to your research question(s).
Instruments—specify the instrument(s) you will use. What is it? How is it valid and reliable? How has it been used? Where is it available?
Variables – 0perationalize your variables.
Data Collection—detail how you will administer your instrument, including dates, times, etc. Support why your selected techniques are reasonable.
Data Analysis—propose how you will store (protect) data and how you will treat missing data. Justify the statistical analysis you will perform, including the p value you will use and why. Describe any assumptions of your chosen analysis and how you will address those assumptions.
Risks –address any risks, biases, and limitations to your study, including how you will address those risks and strengthen the validity and reliability of your study.
Conclusion – summarize your proposal, including the expected academic and practitioner benefits. How will answering your research question also answer “so what?”