The Leadership Challenge

Respond to 2 students discussion post using the references listed below, cite in-text at least one refrence peer review article.

1.Respond to:

The Five Practices were developed by Barry Posner and James Kouzes as a part of their best-selling book The Leadership Challenge. After analyzing the results of millions of surveys on leaders’ behaviors and frequency of The Five Practices, there is a strong indication that followers report being highly engaged and more content in their roles when their leaders adhere to these behaviors frequently.

Beginning with Model the Way, leaders must set a strong example of behavior in order to set a precedent for expectations for followers. It is important for a follower to believe that their leader sets a positive example. This also provides the leader with greater credibility, which, according to Posner and Kouzes, is very important, because you will not believe the message if you don’t believe the messenger (Kouzes & Posner, 2017). Inspiring a shared vision means aligning with your followers on a clear, unique, future-oriented idea (Kouzes & Posner, 2017). This provides followers with a shared goal and values to adhere to, which promotes a culture of synchronicity and satisfaction in the workplace. Challenging the process means developing new, more efficient/effective ways to approach tasks and improve. In addition, it encourages followers to take small, well-calculated risks that can potentially return positive results. Lastly, challenging the process avoids stagnation, which can be detrimental to a work environment and worker morale. Fostering a collaborative workplace by enabling others to act strengthens individuals by increasing self-motivation and improving confidence (Kouzes & Posner, 2017). Lastly, encouraging the heart entails promoting strong performances by issuing appropriate rewards and recognition. This creates a more rewarding work environment for followers and increases satisfaction and talent retention.

As with anything, too much of a good thing can be a bad thing. Although it may seem on paper that following these principles will instantly yield positive results, there is nuance to the way that they should be applied to every work environment. For example, it is possible to come off preachy when attempting to set a positive example (model the way). A leader should first understand that every individual has their own M.O. and will only adapt to a leader’s example to a certain extent. When challenging the process, it is important for a leader to remember that change is not always necessary. Workers may become frustrated if they sense that change is being implemented solely for the sake of change. Also, they should know when it is appropriate to take a risk before deciding to challenge a process. Enabling others to act entails being a hands-on coach (Kouzes & Posner, 2017), however a leader should know when to draw the line in how hands-on their coaching can be. If a leader is too hands-on in coaching, it may result in a follower believing they are not entirely trusted.

Reference

Kouzes, J.M. & Posner, B.Z. (2017). The leadership challenge (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc

Respond to #2 Honesty:

The Five Practices were developed by Barry Posner and James Kouzes as a part of their best-selling book The Leadership Challenge. After analyzing the results of millions of surveys on leaders’ behaviors and frequency of The Five Practices, there is a strong indication that followers report being highly engaged and more content in their roles when their leaders adhere to these behaviors frequently.

Beginning with Model the Way, leaders must set a strong example of behavior in order to set a precedent for expectations for followers. It is important for a follower to believe that their leader sets a positive example. This also provides the leader with greater credibility, which, according to Posner and Kouzes, is very important, because you will not believe the message if you don’t believe the messenger (Kouzes & Posner, 2017). Inspiring a shared vision means aligning with your followers on a clear, unique, future-oriented idea (Kouzes & Posner, 2017). This provides followers with a shared goal and values to adhere to, which promotes a culture of synchronicity and satisfaction in the workplace. Challenging the process means developing new, more efficient/effective ways to approach tasks and improve. In addition, it encourages followers to take small, well-calculated risks that can potentially return positive results. Lastly, challenging the process avoids stagnation, which can be detrimental to a work environment and worker morale. Fostering a collaborative workplace by enabling others to act strengthens individuals by increasing self-motivation and improving confidence (Kouzes & Posner, 2017). Lastly, encouraging the heart entails promoting strong performances by issuing appropriate rewards and recognition. This creates a more rewarding work environment for followers and increases satisfaction and talent retention.

As with anything, too much of a good thing can be a bad thing. Although it may seem on paper that following these principles will instantly yield positive results, there is nuance to the way that they should be applied to every work environment. For example, it is possible to come off preachy when attempting to set a positive example (model the way). A leader should first understand that every individual has their own M.O. and will only adapt to a leader’s example to a certain extent. When challenging the process, it is important for a leader to remember that change is not always necessary. Workers may become frustrated if they sense that change is being implemented solely for the sake of change. Also, they should know when it is appropriate to take a risk before deciding to challenge a process. Enabling others to act entails being a hands-on coach (Kouzes & Posner, 2017), however a leader should know when to draw the line in how hands-on their coaching can be. If a leader is too hands-on in coaching, it may result in a follower believing they are not entirely trusted.

Reference

Kouzes, J.M. & Posner, B.Z. (2017). The leadership challenge (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc